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Testimonials

Breathe Conservation

What people are saying

St Olave's School, London

St Olave’s welcomed guest speaker Sarah Ferguson to talk about plastic. Sarah Ferguson is the founder of Breathe Conservation, an international non-profit organisation that believes in a plastic-free ocean and aims to eliminate disposable plastic.

Sarah spoke passionately about her efforts to clean the ocean of single-use plastic. Every child left the assembly understanding that everyone is responsible and that change starts with the individual.

The pupils asked valuable questions about how they can help to create a cleaner future and were also particularly amazed by Sarah’s open water swimming talents. She certainly inspired many pupils today in a multitude of ways.

Olivia Jones, Public Relations Dynamo

I absolutely loved Sarah’s talk! It was a treat to have a top athlete share so many thrilling stories from her epic swim and to tie it all back to conservation. Sarah’s message was hard hitting but left me feeling hopeful and inspired to make a difference.

Olivia Jones, Public Relations Dynamo, http://oliviajones.co.za/

Mangaliso Sibiya, Grade 5, Chelsea prep

I thought the assembly was fun. Although we had to sit for a long time, I enjoyed listening to all the ways we can stop water pollution. Looking at all the pictures of litter and injured animals was sad but The Environment Team was very prepared and the song was fun. Watching how much Sarah Ferguson did to save the ocean and make a change made me want to help. If we all do our part to help we can make the world a better place. It also inspired me to make a difference in the world.

Mangaliso Sibiya, Grade 5, Chelsea prep, Durban, South Africa

Fiona Mann, teacher- Danville High School

    Hi Sarah I have to tell you. One of the grade 8 class teachers came and told me that her class was planning a party for break up day. So they were discussing what to bring etc. And it got down to paper plates and disposable cups etc. And the girls said no – they must all bring their own reusable lunch boxes/ plates/ cups/ cutlery and whatever else is needed. So your talk has made a difference. The message has sunk home!!

Fiona Mann, teacher- Danville High School, Durban, RSA

Reese Beart, Grade 5, Chelsea prep

I was so sad to hear about how bad all the plastic pollution is getting. I feel so sad for the living creatures that are being affected. When I first heard the song, I thought it was really funny and the ssecond time I knew every word. I learnt that straws are getting stuck up turtle’s noses and that small microplastics are getting eaten by fish. It’s really sad how people just don’t care about the environment and our oceans. We need to care about our marine life because they’re part of the food chain. Our water is precious because only 1% is freshwater, 2% is ice and 97% is salt water. I am also glad that people are trying to prevent this by using metal straws, using their own cups instead of plastic cups to prevent this happening.

Reese Beart, Grade 5, Chelsea prep, Durban, South Africa

Chelsea Prep, Durban

    Today at our assembly, we met Sarah Ferguson. We made a play about the ocean and about how to recycle plastic. Sarah Ferguson swam across the islands of Hawaii. The channel she swam across was called the channel of death. She also let us buy stainless steel straws.

 

Chelsea Prep, Durban

Mandi Pullen- Spar Eastern Cape

“Was lovely to hear you talk with such passion. Thanks for stopping by to  tell us your story”

Mandi Pullen- Spar Eastern Cape

Tamany Geldenhuys, Mauritius

Sarah came to Mauritius to swim in our ocean. To heighten our awareness of plastics and what they are doing to sea creatures. To encourage us to reuse, recycle or refuse plastic. Mostly Sarah came and touched hearts and changed them. Schools are speaking more loudly on this topic, restauranteers are banning straws in their outlets and communities are more aware about plastic usage and making a stand.  Sarah showed us that it takes one ordinary person to choose to make an extraordinary difference one step at a time.

Tamany Geldenhuys, Mauritius

Lighthouse Primary and Secondary School , Mauritius

Our school was privileged to have Sarah address our Primary and Secondary students in two separate sessions. Sarah’s description of her extensive training schedule and marathon swims in various oceans was engaging and interactive. Our students were enthralled by her tales of shark sightings and extra kilometers covered due to strong ocean currents which were accompanied by graphic photos presented on Power Point and Video. The response from our students to support the eradication of plastic bags and keep our oceans clean was overwhelming as was the demand for steel rather than plastic straws. Students were quick to relate Sarah’s stories to their parents, and the community was abuzz with many families and children willing to become good stewards of our environment, particularly oceans. We thank Sarah for her time and hope she enjoys her training schedule for the next big swim

Lighthouse Primary and Secondary School , Mauritius

Alexandra House School, Mauritius

Sarah Ferguson visited Alexandra House School in May 2018 to share her passion about protecting our ocean from plastic pollution. She explained to the children why this is so important and how she does long-distance swims to raise awareness about keeping our seas free of plastic.  The children were spellbound listening to Sarah’s tales of her adventures, and a large awareness was created in our school about the need for urgent action against plastic pollution.

Alexandra House School, Mauritius

Hannah Geldenhuys, aged 11

Sarah Ferguson is a woman from Cape Town, South Africa. She has done many open water swims in South Africa but her main swim was from one Hawaiian island to another. Sarah was the first South African woman to cross that channel. Sarah has an amazing love for the ocean and an amazing story to tell. She trained against strong currents and swam with sharks to prepare for the Hawaiian swim. Plastic bags are bad for the ocean. For example, turtles think the bags are jellyfish so they eat them and die. We must help our ocean to live

Hannah Geldenhuys, aged 11

Sarah Peerally, aged 10

Sarah came to school to raise our awareness about damaging the oceans with plastic. When plastic breaks up, the small pieces get eaten by sea animals and ourselves when we swim. Sarah said that instead of single use plastic, we should use things that you can reuse again and again, such as metal straws

Sarah Peerally, aged 10

Dana Jorgensen, aged 10

Plastic pollution in the world is becoming worse and worse so Sarah wants to help a lot and encourage everyone. She did the long swim to raise awareness. People think that plastic rubbish goes away, but no, it never goes away; it turns into micro plastic particles. Sarah calls them ‘poison pills’ because who or whatever eats them will die. Plastic is killing the oceans. If we are against plastic pollution, we can help, support and recycle and that will make a difference.

Dana Jorgensen, aged 10

Ms. Claire Lindsay, Northlands Girls High School

Thanks again Sarah! The girls and staff LOVED your talk and are all thinking a bit more about what they use!

Ms. Claire Lindsay, Northlands Girls High School, Durban

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